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libya since the operation was launched 24 hours ago. >> u.s. joint chiefs of staff chairman mike mullen says most of gadhafi's air defense systems and airfields have been taken out. libyan ground forces have also been hit. >> the no-fly zone is effectively in place. we have combat air patrol or aircraft over benghazi and we will have them there for on a 24/7 basis. move that to the west and he hasn't flown any aircraft for the last two days. the whole goal here is to get it in place. two, be in a position so that he is unable to massacre his own civilians and that we effect the humanitarian support. from that standpoint, the initial operations have been very effective. >> besides the u.s. britain and france countries taking part in the libyan operation include italy, spain, canada, and qatr. >> gadhafi vowed to fight back what he calls terrorists attacking his country. >> we be victorious. we will achieve victory on behalf of the people. we have allah with us. have you the devil on your side. >> he called coalition nation it is new nazis and promised a, quote, long drawn war. >> nic rob
will be back at the normal time next sunday. u.s. andal lied forces have effectively implemented the no-fly zone. we want to go first to international correspondent nick robertson who is in tripoli. we have heard from gadhafi this morning and know that he is claiming that civilians died in some of these attacks on libya. can you tell from your vantage point because we've talked to admiral mullen who says we were pretty precise in these things, how much of this is propaganda coming out of gadhafi and how much of it can be documented? >> reporter: it's very hard to document any of it. what we have seen on state television on these pictures emerged perhaps an hour and ten minutes after those bombing missions on tripoli on the eastern side of tripoli, there were pictures of army officers inside a hospital visiting wounded men of fighting age, a couple of them appeared to have military uniforms on. some had severe injuries, one had a severe head trauma and being ventilated by hand by a med medic. they were holding up pieces of shrapnel and saying sort of a catch phrase here, 100% support for
likely is it will you jump out of your parent's income group? the u.s. did surprisingly poorly coming in behind denmark, norway, sweden, germany, france, canada. two other such studies confirmed this reality. now, i know what my perception is about america. anyone can make it here, and there are lots of high-profile examples of that. but those are anecdotes. the facts say that for the average joe in recent years social mobility has slowed and other countries have moved ahead. similarly among rich countries over the last 25 years our growth rate per person has not been the strongest. now there are clearly places where we are still number one and the number of guns we own far exceeds any other country. we account for 50% of the world's annual production of weapons. we are number one in terms of our total debt to other countries, but there are really many positive places where we are still number one. that's what i began by listing. but my point is the picture today is a lot more mixed than boastful rhetoric about america is number one suggests. the question i have really is what would i
to help out. the u.s.s. ronald reagan arrived off the coast on sunday and made dozens of trips delivering aid. meanwhile, more video is emerging of the sheer scale of what's hit japan. take a look at this. in a moment, we'll go live to japan. but, first, here is my take. there have been many ways to try to make sense of the tsunami in japan. many analogies from history. the simplest for me is if you take the earthquake that hit new zealand a few weeks ago and multiplied it by 1,000, would you get the one that hit japan. or if you remember the one that devastated haiti last year? this one is several hundred times more powerful. that's why despite all of the precautions and preparedness, the devastation has been so great. in fact, most experts agree that in terms of safety plans and procedures, japan has done almost everything right. it's too soon to draw any important lessons here. too soon to do anything but mourn. but this tragedy does remind us, no matter how much advance work a country does. no matter how well the buildings are built, nothing can prepare you for this. but the work has
>>> held throw our viewers in the u.s. and all over the world. i'm pauline chiou at cnn hong kong. >> i'm nationalie alan in cnn. it is sun afternoon in sendai, japan, where 48 hours ago the biggest earthquake ever recorded in japan struck just offshore. the japanese meet logical society has upgraded that quake to a magnitude of 9.0, while the u.s. geological survey has maintained a rating of 8.9. the city's 1 million people, and countless towns and vimmages to the north were devastated by the subsequent tsunami that crashed over the coastline and tore through everything in its path. while that danger has passed, another has emerged. at this hour, we are tracking a new and extremely serious concern. >> japanese nuclear official says there is a possibility just a possibility, that there could be a meltdown at one of the reactors at the fukushima daiichi nuclear plant. a second reactor is also in trouble, but japan's ambassador to the u.s. has told cnn there is no evidence that a meltdown is under way. >> estimated 80,000 people live within ten kilometers of the plant, six miles, al
've often occurred in japan/u.s. relations, the taken for granted ally, slowly slip and not find its way forward. there's a dark side to this. in japan, when things haven't gone well, when you saw leader after leader, after leader as we've seen in japan's political cycles. unable to deal with the challenges at hand. you see a dark nationalism that grows, because of both a frustration that japan isn't hitting its mark and at the same time a frustration that the -- the paralysis that has dmom natured the political system is keeping japan from being the kind of nation it is. and there is a minority that takes this to the extreme. this could take us in dramatically different directions. >> and, briefly, are you optimistic that this could be the shock to the system that produces some action? >> it does bring out a lot of solidarity among the people and also basically to the political system to see that opposition doesn't exist. this is almost like when the terrorist attack hit the united states. we can put politics aside for a moment. very difficult to transform the structural side of the jap
the former u.s. ambassador to iraq and former director of national intelligence. robert kagan is a senior fellow with the brookings institution and jane harman from california who chaired the subcommittee on counterterrorism and intelligence and is now the new president and ceo of the woodrow wilson center. ambassador, i'm going to start with you because you have been generally supportive of this action in libya. there is an international coalition against gadhafi and nato is assuming responsibility for the no-fly zone, although how that's going to be worked out is a bit murky. let me start by asking you, is this mission this new world order, if you will, going as you would have liked? >> well, i think it's going probably about what the way you would have expected it to. the command and control arrangements are being worked out. the opposition has now con solid consolidating itself in benghazi. whereas a week ago it looked like it was on the verge of extinction and let's not forget those were the events that propelled this rather rapid turnabout in our position. i think what you're gettin
of the union." i'm candy crowley in washington. up next for our viewers in the u.s., "fareed zakaria gps." >> this is gps, the global public square. welcome to all you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. i'll give you my take on what the arab uprisings mean for al qaeda in a moment but first let me give you a preview of the show. today we'll take you inside the mind of the gadhafis. perhaps a scary place to be but we'll talk to a man who has spent many hours with both moammar gadhafi and even more with his son saif gadhafi. phd from the london school of economics who went on tv warning of rivers of flood. what are they thinking. first an all-star gps panel to talk about revolutions abroad and in america over budgets and politics. nick kristof back from the middle east. eliot spitzer familiar with the problems of balancing budgets. david frum. chrystia freeland. what in the world. we found a nation even more divided than our own. finally we'll take a last look at the ultimate mubarak bling. i'll explain. now, there's an interesting debate about whether the event
detained in eastern libya by opposition forces. >>> the u.s. state department is warning americans against traveling to yemen. today's advisory says the threat level in yemen is extremely high due to terrorist activities and civil unrest. comes the same day as suspected al qaeda members killed four yemeni soldiers. >>> in bahrain there was a large but peaceful protest outside the palace where the country's cabinet met today. it was the first time a demonstration had been allowed at the site. protesters chanted slogans calling for toufter of bahrain's prime minister. >>> 12 people were killed and five others injured and i mine explosion in southeastern afghanistan. the blast occurred when a vehicle that people were traveling in hit a land mine. the dead include two children and five women. those are your top stories. up next much more "fareed zakaria gps" and then reliable sources at the top of the hour. homeowners -- rates have been going up, but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at, where customers save an average of $293 a month. call lending tree at
reaction, all in a desperate effort to prevent a meltdown. the japanese ambassador to the u.s. said on our air a short time ago that there was no meltdown in process. but an official with japan's nuclear and industrial safety agency told cnn it is a possibility. there may be one under way. he said we have still not confirmed that there is an actual meltdown but there is a possibility. the reason they think there might be one under way is that they have detected radioactive cesium and radioactive iodine outside of that plant. that official went on to say, however, that we have confidence we will resolve this. that was reiterated by japan's chief cabinet secretary. he said in a press conference a short time ago we can stabilize the situation. now, adding another level to this is the fact that a second reactor at that same plant is now having problems with its cooling system. this is exactly what started the problem at the first reactor so the temperature in the second unit is believed to be rising. we were told by a japanese official that nine people have now had radiation exposure. it's bee
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)